"Big Cats: Lifestyles of Leopards"


 

 

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Big Cats: Lifestyles of Leopards

Were here in the Mala Mala Game Reserve of South Africa to discover the fascinating lifestyle of the wa- whoa! Of the uhm, leopard.

Unlike their lion cousins, leopards are solitary creatures staking out turf. About the only time they arent by themselves is, uh, well, I mean, what male can resist a comely female leopard, especially one with fresh kill? While she climbs the tree to enjoy her meal, he demonstrates that chivalry isnt dead by chasing off a pesky hyena. After all this, the female tries to seduce the male, but he basically ignores her, because he knows shes not ready to mate. And they part company. But only temporarily. The male knows when the female is really, really, really ready to mate, by the scent of her territorial markers. Now, theyll mate from 70 to 100 times a day, for four, five, or even six days! The entire region becomes their honeymoon suite. The male roams his domain and the female follows. Their passionate outcries unnerve some impalas, and they scatter every which way. When their prey almost run them over, the leopard lovers switch back into huntin g mode. Now, heres something rare: collaboration. Two leopards bring down the same impala. After they part ways, the female may give birth about three months later. But with high mortality rates, a mothers large litter can be decimated; only two or three cubs survive. Playing a bit of hide-and-seek, the mother might move her cubs every single day to keep lions, hyenas, and even male leopards from eating them. At three months old, theyre ready to take down their own prey. But it may take them two years to master this incredible skill to the point where itswell, an art form.
 


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"Big Cats: Lifestyles of Leopards"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 
 

 

 
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