"NASA TV's This Week @NASA, July 30 2010"


 

 

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NASA TV's This Week @NASA, July 30 2010

Mission Control:

"Youre looking straight into the camera, absolutely."

Cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Mikhail Kornienko spent nearly seven hours spacewalking to replace a video camera and improve cable connections to the International Space Station.

The two Expedition 24 Flight Engineers outfitted the new Rassvet mini module to host automatic linkups with Russian vehicles arriving at the station. They also routed and mated Command and Data Handling cables on the Zvezda and Zarya modules.

A video camera was removed and replaced on the aft end of Zvezda then successfully tested. Itll be used to provide television views of the final approach and docking of future European Automated Transfer Vehicles carrying cargo to the complex.

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ORION LAUNCH ABORT TESTS - ARC
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Aerospace engineers at the Ames Research Center are using wind tunnels to test a launch abort system, or LAS, for the Orion spacecraft. A six per cent scale model of the spacecraft, complex parts and all, is being used to mimic various launch conditions so researchers can better understand the aerodynamics of Orions liftoff and climb to orbit.

Kevin James:

"We're looking at how the aerodynamics are affected as we do an abort and separation maneuver, and then how to control the vehicle as we go through the abort and recovery as it comes down and the shoots come out."

Comprised of a tower and cover, Orions LAS has a powerfully built launch abort motor which would quickly move the craft and its human cargo away from the launch vehicle in an emergency. The ability to protect astronauts from a launch pad failure is a critical component of human spaceflight, and tests like these help maintain the safety of astronauts throughout their mission.

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BABY STEPS JPL
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Like proud parents watching their baby take its first steps, mission team members gathered in the gallery above the clean room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to witness the Mars Curiosity rover roll for the first time.

Curiosity was guided by engineers and technicians in "bunny suits" as it made its first roll on the clean room floor, moving forward and backward about a meter.

Dr. Ashwin Vasada:

"It's gone from designs on napkins, to Power Point, to CAD drawings, to blueprints and now its a rover."

Curiosity, also known as the Mars Science Laboratory, will be the largest rover ever sent to the Red Planet. Itll carry ten instruments to detect places where life may have existed and whether they have the capacity to preserve the evidence. MSL is scheduled to launch in fall 2011 and set down on Mars the following August.

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MARS MAP JPL
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A camera aboard NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft has helped develop the most accurate global Martian map ever. And not only can researchers access the map so, can the public, explore and survey the entire surface of the Red Planet as well.

The map is made from nearly 21,000 images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System, THEMIS, a multi-band infrared camera on Odyssey. The pictures have been smoothed, matched, blended and cartographically controlled to make a giant mosaic. Users can pan and zoom into the images, with some of the smallest surface details just 330 feet wide.
 


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"NASA TV's This Week @NASA, July 30 2010"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 
 

 

 
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